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3 Things I’ve Learnt From My Coaching Journey

Posted by Jen Waller

Coach Jen WallerGuest post by Jen Waller, Top Ten Winner of Best Coaching Blogs 2011.

I didn’t intend to become a coach, run my own coaching business or be my own boss when I first started out learning about coaching. I just found it increasingly fascinating and enjoyed playing and discovering.

It does mean that it’s difficult to pinpoint the precise moment in time when I first started coaching - it just naturally evolved. I do know that it happened over a decade ago.

There’s mistakes I’ve made, things I could have done differently and action I could have taken faster. However, I’m really comfortable with the choices I’ve made and the path I’ve taken as it’s got me to where and who I am now.

Here’s just 3 of those lessons from when I first started coaching:

1. Coach people from exactly where you are.


Having all the coaching knowledge in the world is not going to make a difference to clients unless you are using them by actually coaching people! Some of the best learning experiences I’ve had have come from working with clients.

That does not mean I’m suggesting don’t ever seek and take formal training courses. I personally believe that it’s a duty I have to my current/future clients to continually develop, explore and refine my work.

I am suggesting that you don’t put off putting it into practice!

2. You don’t have to listen and get involved with any distracting thoughts about self doubt or insults

I remember when I first started coaching that I had all these distracting thoughts running through my head.

It was not at all unusual to realise I was paying attention to questions in a coaching session such as

  • “Am I good enough?”
  • “ I can’t ask that question, what will they think?” or
  • “Who am I to ask that question?”


On other occasions it could be a running negative commentary on how terrible a question was, how something was clumsily worded or a general observation that my coaching was terrible and awful! - All a bit distracting to really focus and listen to my client in that moment.

It was the realisation that coaching was not about me, it was about the client in front of me (or at the other end of the phone) that made the difference for me.

It was the catalyst so that when I recognised those thoughts I could let them go, not get caught up in them and return my focus to my client in that moment – that thinking could be indulged in “my time”, as I thought of it, outside of that session.

Funny thing was that the more I didn’t get caught up in those thoughts during a session, the less they seemed relevant when it came to “my time” outside the session!

3. Not knowing a “script” of questions in advance is OK, it doesn’t mean that you are not prepared.

As you watch others coaching, attend trainings and generally read around the subject you will no doubt come across some fantastic questions. Ones that leap out at you so that you want to store them away to pull out in one of your own coaching sessions.

At some stage in my early development I mixed up preparing for a coaching session with having to have a list of pre-planned questions complete with the order they would be asked in the session ahead.

For a while I thought that the fact that I found that really difficult to create (and when I did, never stuck to the list in reality) meant that I was a terrible coach. I let it get in the way of how confident I felt with my coaching.

What I had missed was the fact that this is a coaching conversation. I don’t generally pre-plan conversations in other contexts, I allow those to flow naturally in response to what the other person says. So why do it with a coaching conversation?

Those questions stored away for future use still come in useful but they are used when it’s the “best fit” with where my client is at that moment.

This new way of thinking also allows for the possibility that some of the most powerful questions utilise that individuals own language. If you like, questions that you create in the moment prompted by the answer just given – even if it is one similar to the ones you’ve stored away for future reference.

I’ve selected just three out of many possible things I’ve learnt. These are just my experience, what about yours?

If you are new to coaching, what can you take from this post that will make a difference to your next step?

If you have more coaching experience, what would you share for your personal journey?

Best Coaching Bloggers

Jen Waller is on a mission to support, nurture and encourage coaching skills and talents from non-coach to coach and beyond.

Her coaching blog, Coaching Confidence, is a blog for coaches of all niches. Containing daily quotes, alongside posts covering topics such as personal development, coaching skills and resources. Each Friday the blog hosts a guest post covering a broad range of different coaching experiences, styles and approaches.

Want to enter Best Coaching Blogs 2012?

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Topics: coaching business, Coaching, Best Coaching Blogs, blog, blogs, blogging, become a coach, coaching clients

2012 Trends in Business and Life Coaching

Posted by Julia Stewart

Coaching TrendsThe 2012 ICF Coaching Study Executive Summary was just released, revealing worldwide trends in business and life coaching.

This year's coaching study is the biggest  ever, with over 12,000 coaches responding from 117 nations. Extrapolating from that data, the ICF estimates that there are now 47,500 professional coaches, worldwide.

It's no surprise that the greatest concentration of coaches and highest paid coaches are in 'high income areas' like North America, Western Europe and Oceania (Australia and New Zealand). What surprised me is that Oceania leads the world both in high pay and the number of coaches relative to its population. (Go Aussies!)

Here are 6 more 2012 trends in business and life coaching from the ICF Survey:

  • Total annual revenue from professional coaching worldwide is now nearly 2 Billion (In US Dollars). That means it's nearly doubled in the past few years.
  • Most coaches are reporting an increase in fees, clients, hours and revenues over the past 12 months, despite the global economy, showing once again, that coaching does well even in poor economic times.
  • Most coaches predict a further increase in fees, clients, hours and revenue in the coming 12 months.
  • Latin America and the Caribbean are currently reporting the greatest rates of growth, as coaching continues to enter and succeed in new markets.
  • A majority of professional coaches say they want the industry to become regulated, with the greatest proportion stating that the industry of coaching should be regulated by coaching associations rather than governments.
  • When asked what they thought would be the greatest challenge to the profession of coaching in the coming year, the number one threat was identified as 'untrained individuals who call themselves coaches', followed by 'marketplace confusion' (which is caused, in part, by untrained individuals who call themselves coaches). This also points to why the idea of regulation is gaining traction among business and life coaches.

Do any of these 2012 trends in business and life coaching surprise you? You're invited to comment below.

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Topics: coaching business, Coaching, coach training, Coaches, ICF, Business Coaches, Life Coaches, Life Coaching

Why Coaching by Phone is Better Than Coaching in Person

Posted by Julia Stewart

Coaching by phoneI finally have an answer for you to the age-old question: Which is more effective, coaching by telephone or coaching in person?

The coaches who prefer coaching in person, invariably assume their way is better. Those of us who prefer to coach by telephone sheepishly counter that coaching by phone seems to work just as well.

But is telephone coaching really just as good as coaching face-to-face?

After all, we've all read the scientific estimates that up to 90% of the information we receive in a face-to-face conversation is visual, not verbal. So how can telephone coaching possibly work as well as face-to-face coaching?

And from another perspective, face-to-face coaches often brag that they make more money per hour, but do they really? Yes, telephone coaches charge their clients on average slightly less per contact hour, but they also spend less time in non-contact hours.

I'll explain: While I don't recommend scheduling your clients back-to-back (a 15 minute break helps you refocus), I've done it and I know lots of other phone coaches who do it and I can tell you that a few hours, earning $300/hour, from my home office on a snowy Monday sure beats traffic jams, commuter trains, crowded elevators and cafeteria lunches, ad nauseum, by a mile. And when you add up the extra time spent in transit, plus tolls, tickets, parking, gas, wardrobe, wear and tear on your car, eating out, not to mention all of the above which also has to be spent on in-person client attraction, versus attracting clients via the internet, I'm willing to bet telephone coaches make more per hour, keep more of it for themselves,  and enjoy more of their working hours with less stress. A coach who's relaxed and having fun is always better than one who is not.

But here's why telephone coaching is actually more effective than face-to-face coaching:

Remember how up to 90% of information taken in during a face-to-face conversation is visual? That should make face-to-face coaching 10 times more effective than telephone coaching, but it doesn't. Why? Because nearly all of that visual information is unconscious, meaning the coach isn't even aware of it.

It gets worse. Many assume that our brains absorb continuous information, like video cameras  making a movie, but they don't. Not even close. Your brain takes a couple of snapshots of visual information and fills in (nearly all) the rest with your expectations, assumptions, beliefs, shadows, biases and prejudices. In short, while you're talking to that person, you're taking in some new information from them, but you're unconsciously adding 80-90 times as much information from your past.

And you don't even know it.

With telephone coaching, if you're well-trained, you learn to consciously hear more. And if you practice those hearing skills in hundreds of coaching sessions, you develop the kind of hearing - at least for conversations - that usually only the blind possess because thousands of hours of coaching changes your brain. That means you can hear far more than most of us ever thought possible. And you do it without adding tons of info from your past.

Are telephone coaches completely free of their past assumptions? No, of course not; no one is. But a strong case can be made that, because telephone coaching is a skill that's consciously learned from the ground up, the coach is aware of a larger percentage of incoming information, which helps them interface more fully with the present and the uniqueness of their client and the client's situation.

Here's an example: I've lost track over the years of the number of clients I've coached who were of a different race, socio-economic background, or sexual orientation, and I didn't know it. I'd like to think that wouldn't make any difference (unless it was pertinent to the topic of the coaching), but I've seen the studies on that and know how unlikely it is that anyone is completely free of biases.

Telephone coaching doesn't eliminate all assumptions and biases, but it narrows them down and makes it less likely that a bias or shadow can lurk undiscovered.

Here's another reason coaching by phone is more powerful: When using the telephone (or Skype), you can coach with anyone in the world. That means that out of over 7 billion people worldwide, you can match up with your ideal clients and be their perfect coach. Coaching in person is almost always constrained by distance and travel, forcing people to coach with whomever they can find in their home city.

You'd think with the ease and low cost of talking via online video, that video coaching would catch on quickly, but it hasn't so far. I'm guessing it's because video tends to highlight the visual in a way that makes it even harder to listen and really hear - and raises the likelihood that unconscious visual information is triggering a conditioned response. And if people can see their own image, they are more self conscious and less likely to show up authentically. Some find video coaching more distracting than anything. Indeed, some find talking by telephone t o have an intimacy that's lost with video.

Last but not least, from the client's perspective, lower prices for telephone coaching, plus higher quality coaching, means a greater ROI (return on investment) for clients. Who doesn't like that?

In short: phone coaching is not only just as good as in-person coaching, it's actually better. Do you agree?

We've been training our coaches via distance learning and preparing them for international coaching careers for over a decade. Find out more below:

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Topics: coaching business, Coaching, money, coach training, Coaches, coaching clients, coach, clients, coaching call, phone coaching

Your Coaching Questions Answered: Dreaded Coaching Conversations

Posted by Julia Stewart

Your Coaching Questions AnsweredA month ago, I posted to this blog with questions about conversations that coaches dread and I mentioned that best-selling author, Deborah Brown-Volkman, and I are working on a related project...

Well, I'm ready to tell you about the 1st step in the related project: It's a series of 4 interactive webinars, hosted by Deborah and me on 4 types of conversations that coaches tend to dread and how to handle them.

You see, Deborah and I are both constantly asked by stressed-out coaches who are unprepared for tricky communication issues that come up all the time and we knew somebody needed to address this stuff, like...


  • Clients who lie or don't follow through on fieldwork
  • Potential clients who say they 'can't afford' you
  • Clients who don't pay on time
  • How to fix it when you've said the wrong thing

These issues aren't just embarrassing and stressful; the fear and confusion that come from not knowing what to say or how to handle tough situations like these can bring your success to a screeching halt!

So here's what we're doing to help: In these 4 one-hour Q&A webinars, Deborah and I will offer advice on how to handle the most-oft asked questions, but we won't stop there: You can ask your biggest questions and we'll answer on the spot.

Think of it as an injection of clarity that brings you the ease and confidence you want for yourself and your business - and we're doing it at a price that any savvy coach can handle:

Take one class or all four and get the answers you need on 4 Mondays, January 23rd to February 13th, 2-3 PM EST (GMT-5). They're just $30 per class...but if you act quickly you can save up to $40!

  • How to Have Have Tough Conversations With Potential Coaching Clients

  • How to Deal With Renegade Coaching Clients

  • How to Create Ideal Coaching Clients With Advanced Communication Skills

  • How to Have Conversations That Create Your Ideal Coaching Business

Here's a secret to all of these questions: The are all best handled proactively. But how can you set up yourself for success if you don't know what to expect? Easy. Ask your questions and listen to the questions and answers that other coaches share on these value-packed calls. Deborah and I know a lot and we're ready to share!

Seating is limited and classes are filling up. But if you act fast (a.k.a. proactively), you can save $10 on each class that you sign up for. How?

Register by January 20th and get each class for $20: Add the discount code below when you register online. Click 'Apply' and the cost of each class will be lowered to just $20. But you must use the discount code no later than 5 PM EST this Friday, January 20th.

Discount Code: Early20

Click below to register now:

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Topics: coaching business, Coaching, webinar, coaching questions

New Free Coach Training Tool

Posted by Julia Stewart

Free Coach Training Tools

[UPDATE: DECEMBER 2012 - The Coaching Certificate Exam is no longer available with the Free Coach Training Program.]

As effective as Free Coach Training is, the downside is that new coaches need to track their own progress. That said, a talented new coach can launch his/her own coaching business just with the 28-hour Free Coach Training program. And now you have a new tool to help you with that!

As FCT graduate and Coaching Certificate holder, Scott Schumacher, has said:

"I had no idea how a 28 hour free training program could so effectively set me on a path to coaching as a profession.  This program was also a huge self-development boost for me, and I discovered so much about myself and ways I could improve my communication with friends, how I “showed up” in the world every day, and that I could almost naturally start affecting others with this change in myself."

Our Ultimate Coach Training members get quite a bit more support from us. But I decided that it's time to add a new tool (The ICF would call it an accountability structure; the IAC would call it a supportive structure...) that will help you stay on track, learn what you need to learn, become who you need to become, get your Coaching Certificate, and understand your next steps toward becoming a successful coach.

 

Picture by L. Marie

Topics: coaching business, coach training, free coach training, ICF, coaching career, IAC, coaching tool

Coaching Tip: Discovering My “Why” at 19,341 Feet

Posted by Evelyn Kalinosky

Coaching TipGuest post by Evelyn Kalinowsky, 1st Place Winner of Best Coaching Blogs 2011.

This weekend marks the unofficial end of summer. Labor Day – dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. Four months left to make that impact I’ve been cultivating in my coaching business since January 1st and leave my mark on the year known as 2011.


When I think about particular take-aways from the past eight months, one of the most striking is the number of business colleagues who worked with me to grow my business, even as they worked to build their own.


I feel all lovey and squishy inside knowing they were the ones who’ve helped me to fold in all the different experiential metaphors that are my life into marketing language that my “just right” people can understand. They helped me create the WELCOME sign and the road map so my peeps can find me.


And don’t get me started on how they managed to get me to embrace my adventurous soul in a way that’s enabled me to draw this exquisite, yet craggy picture (maybe it’s more of a topographical map) of how someone like me can grow my coaching business, one step at a time.


Just like climbing. Breathe. Step. Rest. Hydrate. Breathe. Step. Rest. Hydrate. The mountaineering/business-or-bust mantra.


The journey of building my business reminds me of the time I signed up for a mountaineering trip that challenged many of the assumptions I held about myself: can’t do anything for myself, am too afraid to push physical limits, haven’t got the expertise or chops for this kind of gig, am incapable physically, incapable of being liked, etc.


Am I losing you with the mountaineering metaphor? Too masculine? I hope not, because sometimes we women are hesitant to embrace our “masculine” energy, but it’s that raw, powerful, surefooted-in-the-midst-of-scrambling-up-the-scree stepping that serves us so well if we let it.


I don’t see it as masculine or feminine, but more like yin and yang – the balance of opposites – and knowing when to use which type of energy is a vital tool to carry in our back pocket or handbag (or backpack, if you prefer) when you’re building a business.


I signed up for a 2 week expedition to Tanzania, Africa when I turned 40, and spent a week climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro – all 19,341 feet of it.


To say that I was a neophyte at climbing is an understatement of mega proportions, but I was compelled to go for all of the reasons I mentioned earlier (and more), and at the end of that glorious, awe-inspiring, ass-kicking experience I had transformed.


Literally.
             Physically.
                             Emotionally.
                                                Spiritually.
                                                                 Energetically.


You name it, I transformed it (or it transformed me is more accurate).


That’s the year “Evelyn” was born, and I rather like the delusional notion that I’m only 12 now instead of really 52, and despite the fact that I would NEVER want to negate the birth of each of my children (or grandchildren) by that statement, in the truly esoteric realm of “being born,” that was my raw, naked, heart-pumping delivery into the world.


I’ve been growing the real me ever since.


In addition to the obvious similarities between climbing a mountain and building a coaching business, there is my big “Why” – the reason I’m doing this work in the first place.


To bottom line it: oh, how over-the-moon I would have been to have had someone like me be my she-Sherpa guide on my journey! FYI - That’s not a vain attempt to pat myself on the back and glow giddy over my wonderfulness.


My “Why” is about helping other midlife career women traverse the mountains, the hills, and even the easy-does-it open fields that make up their complicated, multi-faceted lives in concert with someone who’s been there.


It’s about them not having to navigate alone the unknown terrain when they’re tired, vulnerable and drifting without a map. Because of course they can do it, these mighty warrior women, but the point is why do it alone when there is so much more to gain from working with someone who gets it?


There’s something to be said for the buddy system – whether it’s a guide who leads you up the mountain, or a coach who mentors you in a one-on-one program, or other business women who form a safety net around you as you build a business.
And I need quite a net, since the goals I’ve set for my itty bitty biz are pretty damn high! And when I reach that metaphorical 19,341 business summit I don’t expect to be alone. I’m expecting to see a few of my biz colleagues of the soul planting their flags right alongside me.


Oh yeah, baby!! It’s going to be awesome!


Evelyn Kalinosky is Founder & CEO of Inner Affluence. She works with midlife career women who want to increase their sacred capital. Email her at evelyn [@] evelynkalinosky [.] com or visit her website to learn more.


[UPDATE: Visit Evelyn's entry in Best Coaching Blogs 2012]

Best Coaching Blogs
 
 
Visit Best Coaching Blogs 2011 Here.

Topics: business coach, coaching business, Best Coaching Blogs, coaching blogs, coach, Coaching Tip, clients

Coaching Client Engagements: Should They Be Short or Long?

Posted by Julia Stewart

Coaching clientsThe following post concerning how long coaching client engagements should be is inspired by a conversation at School of Coaching Mastery's members-only Water Cooler Forum. A student wondered how to set up coaching client engagements.

The Question:

Should coaching client engagements be short (3 - 6 months) or long (1 year or longer)? And should coaching client engagements have a fixed length or should they be open ended?

Here are my views. I find the length of coaching engagement varies according to the business model, niche, and specialty of the coach, as well as the goals of the client.

 

The Short or Fixed-length Coaching Client Engagement:

    •    Shorter engagements of specific length are common to business, executive, career and corporate coaching, where the bottom line is always of high importance.
    •    Lengths usually are 3, 6 or 12 months. Almost never shorter than 3 months.
    •    The per-hour or per-month charge is generally much higher, $300+/hour; $500+ per month, or the charge may be for the entire period.
    •    If you use this business model, know that you must be prospecting for your next clients at all times.
    •    Benefit to the coach, other than the higher fee, is that you can sometimes contract to coach an entire team, department or company. In other words, it can be a very significant gig and you may need fewer gigs to support your business.
    •    Benefit to the company that hires you, is that the fees are fixed and predictable and ROI is easy to measure.


Long or Open-ended Coaching Client Engagements:

    •   Open-ended coaching agreements are common in life coaching and other forms of personal coaching, such as health, restorative, personal development, and spiritual coaching.
    •    Minimum lengths of client engagements are 3 months. Any less than that and the client is unlikely to experience a specific outcome and may not see the value of continuing. Also, the coach is likely to get stuck on a merri-go-round, constantly trying to attract enough clients, if they allow clients to sign up for one month or less.
    •    Keeping one's ego out of the coaching engagement is extremely important in open-ended client engagements and depends on on the coach's personal development and integrity. Also, having plenty of money in the bank can be  important for the coach. Otherwise, the coach may be tempted to stretch out the client engagement for the coach's financial benefit, rather than the client's personal development. Some coaches, especially those who are less well developed, assume that all coaches create dependancy in long-term coaching engagements, but that's not necessarily so.
    •    In a long-term coaching relationship, the coach needs to keep an eye out for what else the client may need to work on. Periodically invite the client to a new higher level of play when you sense they are ready for it. Some clients absolutely love this, because they want to grow as much as possible. Think: Empowerment vs. Dependence.
    •    Generally, coaches charge less for this type of coaching, $250 - 450/pr month or $100-200/hour.
    •    The benefit for the coach is greater client stability and less marketing, although annual income may be lower than for business coaches. Benefit for the client is greater personal growth and fulfillment.


My colleagues and I have all experimented with these business models. Commonly, what we find is that when we raise our fees to over $500/month, we have no trouble attracting clients, but coaching client engagements tend to be shorter.

In my coaching business, I offer three different types of coaching. My life coaching clients focus on personal development, shadows, values, attraction, etc. My fees are lower and engagements sometimes are for several years.

I also offer mentor coaching for coaches, which includes working toward certification, business development and personal development. Fees are a bit higher and engagements last 6 to 12 months.

Finally, I offer business coaching that focuses on inbound marketing for micro businesses. Fees are higher and engagements last from 3 to 6 months.

How do you model your coaching client engagements?

The Water Cooler Forum is one of the 'hidden benefits' of membership in School of Coaching Mastery's paid coach training programs. Get your questions answered by mentors and insiders:

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Topics: business coach, coaching business, life coach, coach training, coaching clients, make a living as a life coach, Mentor Coaching, personal development, personal coaching

What's Standing Between You and a Full Coaching Practice?

Posted by Julia Stewart

Whether you're a brand new coach or a veteran, one of the most painful experiences is to have too few coaching clients.

If that's you, read on...

What's standing between you and a full coaching practice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What’s the #1 thing stopping you from filling your coaching practice?

I’m a new coach

- SOLUTION: Time; stick with it

I’m shy, unsure

- SOLUTION: Experience creates confidence; so get to work ;-)

I don’t feel like a real coach, yet (credibility to self and others)

- SOLUTION: Start coaching, now and you’ll immediately BE a real coach!

I don’t know who/how to invite

- SOLUTION: You may need training to get started and enough practice that you'll learn everything you need

I’m too busy with something else

- SOLUTION: Commitment; stop kidding yourself! Do you really want this?

I hate to market

- SOLUTION: You need to shift perspective, because all human communication is marketing

I have a fear of rejection

- SOLUTION: Either feel the fear and do it anyway, or work with a coach or psychotherapist to get over your fear once and for all. For many people, doing the feared activity over and over reduces or eliminates the fear.

What's standing between you and a full coaching priactice?

Whatever your reason for not having the coaching business you really want, Coach 100 can help you get it.

Learn about the Coach 100 Program, by reading the free ebook. Coach 100 Basic is specially priced for a limited time.

 

Coach 100 eBook

Get the free Coach 100 eBook here.

Topics: coaching business, Coach 100, coaching clients, getting clients, new coaches

The Science of Attracting Coaching Clients

Posted by Julia Stewart

Double Dutch by PitsLamp resized 600

 

As a professional service provider, there are two things you must learn in order to succeed with coaching.

1. How to coach professionally: This includes polishing your coaching skills until you provide value worth approximately 10 times what your clients pay.

2. How to attract coaching clients: This includes filling your client roster for the first time (usually the toughest) and then keeping it full or even maintaining a waiting list of eager clients.

 

Obviously, #1, providing 10 times the value, will help you with #2. But did you know that #2, attracting lots of coaching clients, is the key to #1?

 

The data tell us that these two skills, delivering coaching value and attracting clients, comprise a constantly repeating feedback loop. One builds on the other and visa versa. That’s why some coaches are extraordinarily successful, while others seem to struggle forever.

 

You’ve got to step into that loop and stay there. Kind of like Double Dutch

 

If you learned Double Dutch as a kid, you know that just getting into the game is a challenge, especially for the newbie. It takes courage, lots of energy and great timing. And staying in the game requires 10 times as much of all three.

 

But that’s what makes it so darn fun.

 

You might not think that science and data are fun or even appropriate for coaching. After all, coaching done well is an art form. But when the data teach you what to do more of and what to do less in order to succeed quickly, you get more of what you want faster. And your clients get more value.

 

You’re in the loop. That’s more fun.

 

Unfortunately, most coaches, especially those who are new, do not have access to data that helps them get what they want. You need a large sampling from your own business to get actionable data that can guide you. This requires that you start experimenting early and often.

 

Think of experimentation as Play + Feedback = Rapid Growth.

 

I’ve recently collected data on 22 coaches who have participated in Coach 100 in the past year. Coach 100 is a long-term experiment that teaches coaches how to get clients by offering complimentary coaching sessions. This gives them a large enough sample to get actionable data.

Some Coach 100 coaches in my sample were brand-spanking new when they started the program. Others were long-time veterans. Collectively, they offered 464 complimentary sessions, or an average of 21 per coach. The most sessions offered was 106, by one coach, and the least, just 1 session each, by four coaches.

Between them, they got:

  • 219 testimonials (gold, especially for the new coach who needs evidence to prove their ability)
  • 75 referrals for potential clients (again, gold, especially when you’re building a new business)
  • 162 clients (gold, period).

That’s more than seven clients, each, or one client for every three complimentary sessions. That’s the average. Interestingly, the newbie coaches did almost as well as the veterans, especially the ones who coached the most people. That suggests they're learning really fast.

 

Could you use 7 new coaching clients?

 

Of course part of the treasure that the coaches receive is in the feedback they get privately from each person they coach via their Coach 100 Feedback Survey.

Their individual feedback data help them:

a. find their niche and specialty, which makes future marketing much easier

b. helps them learn to sign on clients with finesse, which brings all-important income

c. helps them become master coaches and even get certified (remember: 10 times the value).

Last but not least, Coach 100 gets coaches into that all-important feedback loop where they’re playing full out and simultaneously learn to deliver amazing value, while attracting plenty of clients. That’s where extraordinary success happens. Why?

 

See those master Double Dutch players doing back flips, above?

 

They’re performing in exhibitions and competitions. Think they practice hundreds of hours for those events? If they want to win, they do. Think they hone their craft with the feedback they get during every competition? Again, if they want to win. Lots of practice, lots of events, lots of feedback (data). That’s how you master Double Dutch. That’s how you win. 

Coaches need similar structures to get them into that feedback loop so they can master coaching sessions and master the science of getting coaching clients. The Coach 100 process does all that and gives a certification, too.

Could you coach 100 people without the program? Theoretically, yes, but I’ve never seen anyone do it. It helps to have a structure that streamlines the process and supports the coach through to the end. Coaches need structure and systems to succeed, just like their clients.

 

Want to win at master coaching sooner, rather than later?

 

You may want to join a small group of high performers who are focused on filling their client rosters in about three months. I’ll be your personal mentor coach.

runner small

 

Master the science of attracting coaching clients here.

 

Double Dutch photo by Pitslamp

Topics: coaching business, group coaching, Coach 100, coaching clients, make a living as a life coach, Coaching 100, marketing and sales, master coach, sales training for new coaches, coaching niche

Sage Advice From a Successful New Coach

Posted by Julia Stewart

Gregg SchillingerGregory Schillinger was one of the first coaches to take a chance on School of Coaching Mastery three years ago.

So you can imagine that I was pretty darned pleased when Gregg called me up a few weeks ago and told me he's now making more money than he ever thought possible. This, while building a new coaching business in the middle of the Great Recession!

It's really no surprise, though. Gregg is an enormously talented coach and successful businessman. But then, coaches who are attracted to the word, mastery, tend to be a cut above. Hence our name, School of Coaching Mastery.

To paraphrase Gregg, it's the ones who 'get it' that you want to attract, because they get the most value.

I invite you to listen to my entire interview with Gregg, below (worth listening to the full 24 min.), because his experience can help you succeed beyond your expectations, too, but here's an outtake that is pure gold:

'If I had a plan that said I want to make this amount, I wouldn't have. And much to my wife's surprise, and now I think she's come around to think that it's good to have a plan, but best to be able to adapt for reality, because you never know who you're going to meet on the street, or in a conversation, or through a contact and that's where the plan really starts to take place. You know, it's a fluid thing.

I'm doing very well, I must say. Better than I ever have or thought I would. But in the end of the day, why not? Why shouldn't I do well and why shouldn't anybody do well? I think forcing the expectation would have done me no good.

Accept what I have now and having faith that it would all work out is how. That's my plan. That's it in a nutshell.'

Gregg's a business coach who specializes in helping new restaurant owners succeed. His website is: CoachingRestaurants.com

Unfortunately, the audio player isn't working on this page, but you can listen to this audio here.

Are you also a coach or coach-to-be who's attracted to mastery and an 'early adopter'? You may be a perfect fit for our new Ultimate Coach Training Pilot Membership Program, which can save you a bundle. You can't read about it on our site, but you can attend a free class this week to learn about it. There are just seven spots open in this program.

 

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Topics: business coach, coaching business, School of Coaching Mastery, become a business coach, coach, what does it take to become a coach, coach training program, business plan

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