School of Coaching Mastery

Coaching Blog

Is the International Association of Coaching Headed the Wrong Way?

Posted by Julia Stewart

International Association of Certified Coaches

Yesterday, I got an odd email from the International Association of Coaching (IAC) President, Bob Tschannen-Moran.

Maybe I misunderstood, but it seemed to me that Bob was trying to tell me that a recording that I made with Natalie Tucker Miller and Elizabeth Nofziger, who are both IAC & SCM Certifiers, and using systems that belong to my company, actually belongs to the IAC to do as it sees fit, regardless of my wishes. Hmm...I think U.S. Copyright and Freedom of Speech laws would differ with that.

[Update: I just received a note from Bob, saying of course the recording is mine. I did indeed misunderstand. This post isn't an attack on Bob or the IAC Boards. I just disagree - or misunderstand. You're invited to add your thoughts in the comments section, below.]

If you know me well, you're probably chuckling, because I'm somewhat famous for my temper. It’s my worst weakness. On the up side, I always learn something valuable when I get mad. Here's what I'm learning from my latest tempest:

My loyalty actually lies more with Thomas Leonard's International Association of Certified Coaches (See the original logo above) than it does with the current IAC.  Today's IAC is the organization that evolved from that over the past seven years and of course, it is different. The problem for me is that I'm not okay with all of the differences.

If you’re curious, check out Thomas Leonard's original announcement about the IACC here. Is it better or worse? That's a matter of opinion, but here are some of my thoughts:

Thomas' vision for improving the quality of coaching worldwide was huge. He saw a skills-based coach certification as the vehicle to bring about this worldwide upgrade to coaching excellence and the IACC was the organization to oversee it.  It could only be accomplished if large numbers (most?) of coaches got on board. With a big mailing list of devoted followers and a willingness to put up $25,000 seed money, Thomas had the tools to make it work.

Given Thomas' tragic death less than five months after he announced the IACC, it is a triumph that it survived at all. His estate was tied up for over a year. His company changed hands and took a different path. However, the IACC already had thousands of passionate supporters. Many of whom, like me, were donating their time to make it happen. Still, it was a disturbing sign that his vision was already being watered down, when not long after Thomas' passing, the International Association of Certified Coaches' name was changed. It's now the International Association of Coaching.

What about the commitment to Certified Coaches? Read on.  

The IAC retained the Certified Coach brand. Although it no longer uses the Proficiencies, it still certifies coaches using a process similar to the one Thomas and the original IACC President, Michael 'Coop' Cooper, laid out. It is a very rigorous certification process that only about 25% of coaches pass on the first try. It does indeed raise the quality of coaching for many who attempt it.

However, the IACC's sister organization, the Coaching School Accreditation Council, announced at the same time by Thomas, doesn't exist. This organization would decide if a school could teach the intellectual property on which the Certified Coach designation is based and thereby prepare coaches to get certified. 

Is there an IAC coaching school accreditation process? No. Rather than a coaching school accreditation as rigorous its coach certification, the IAC has chosen instead to make its IAC Coaching Masteries(TM) available to anyone via a commercial license. It doesn't matter if you're a coach, a dentist, a plumber or a marine biologist, if you want to be an IAC Licensee and teach the Masteries, all you have to do is pay the IAC some money. What?

The IAC doesn't even require its licensees to be IAC Certified Coaches. Funny, they have one of the world's most rigorous coach certifications, but apparently anybody with a credit card is qualified to train coaches to prepare for it. Where is the consistency of purpose?

Worse, the IAC website doesn't clearly communicate this to visitors. Most people (in the U.S. anyway) assume that a license means some kind of test has been taken. If you want a license to practice medicine, you have to pass a test. If you want a license to drive, you have to pass a test, etc., etc. But if you want a license to teach the IAC Coaching Masteries(TM) all you need is some money. Good for the IAC, not so good for coaching.

A commercial license is the type you agree to if you want to use software by Microsoft or Apple. It's a bunch of legalese you must accept in order to use their intellectual property. It doesn't imply approval, it simply protects the organization that does the licensing.

The IAC license protects the IAC from risk, but it offers no leadership to the coaching world, not the sort that the IACC was founded upon. An organization can't lead without taking risks. 

Although I'm really not okay with the IAC's commercial license, I was the first to buy one. Why? I still believe in this certification. I'm just disappointed that so little attention has been paid to HOW coaches will upgrade their coaching by seeking IAC Coach Certification. The IAC says it is not in their mandate to teach or accredit. But this is an important need and leaving it unaddressed leaves a big crack in the process. The result is that only a fraction of Certified Coaches exist compared to the original intent. 

Numerous coaches have told me privately that they think the commercial license is a big mistake. However, the membership has virtually no way to fight it. Because although the original IACC granted voting rights to all Certified Coaches, the current Board of Governors (BOG) and Board of Certifying Examiners choose their own replacements, not the members. This means they can change the rules without even notifying us.

Don't get me wrong, many Board members are my close friends and colleagues. There are some dedicated people there working hard on the IAC and I think their intentions are good. But if you want to get on the BOG, you have to be recommended by a current BOG member and then voted on by the other BOG members. That can block certain people from ever being able to serve.

The current voting structure leaves the BOG unaccountable to anyone. It's easy for a comfortable 'group think' to set in and for board members to agree on rules that work for them, but not for the whole membership. If the IAC were to become the huge worldwide organization that Thomas envisioned, a small group of people and their friends would have too much power over this fast-growing billion-dollar industry.

Even though I've been invited to join both Boards, I'm not comfortable with the current process. I think IAC members should be making these choices, themselves. Give them the vote! Members of an organization who have voting rights tend to be more engaged and invested in it. Because there’s a disconnect between the board, the members and the mission, many of the original supporters have fallen away.

Is it fair for me to expect today's IAC to act like the original IACC? Probably not. But some elements that I think are critical to its mission, the mission that I still care about, have been lost over the years and that makes a big difference, at least to me.

That leaves me wondering whether School of Coaching Mastery's IAC license is still a fit for us. Without it, I'd have greater freedom in developing my own intellectual property and there wouldn't be disagreements over who owns my recordings.

Don't worry, if you're an SCM student, we're not going to make any changes right away and regardless, we'll keep our agreements. Even if we drop the license, we can still help you get certified. I've been helping coaches pass IAC Coach Certification since 2003 and the past two years since we first bought the IAC license (It wasn't available until then) haven't helped us do that any better.

What do you think? Should the IAC's Board be voted on by the IAC Membership? Should the IAC continue to license any and all comers? Is there any reason to stay faithful to the original IACC mission? Should members have more power? Or should we just quietly go on paying our dues?

By the way, if you're curious about the recording in question, it's available for free to members of the IAC North American Virtual Chapter, a free service for all coaches that we offer and that is aligned with the IAC.

Join the coaching chapter

 

Join the IAC North American Virtual Chapter for free here. 

Topics: Coaching, School of Coaching Mastery, SCM, Thomas Leonard, IAC Certified Coach, IAC Coaching Masteries, Natalie Tucker Miller, IAC Certification, certified coaches, International Association of Coaching, IAC

China Steps Up to the Coaching Game in a Huge Way

Posted by Julia Stewart

Coach Natalie Tucker Miller Coach Natalie Tucker Miller just returned with some amazing insights from last week's Shanghai Coaching Conference.

School of Coaching Mastery's own Dean of Students, Natalie Tucker Miller, IAC-CC, just returned from her visit to China as keynote speaker for the 2010 Shanghai Coaching Conference. As former President of the IAC and the current Lead Certifier for the IAC, Natalie was a natural choice to keynote for this first ever live IAC coaching conference.

But more than that, Natalie is one of the best examples of a great coach that I know. I'm sure coaches in Asia loved just being in the room with her!

It wasn't easy catching up with Natalie to do an interview, but I knew that our readers from around the globe would be curious to hear about the enthusiasm and desire to embrace coaching mastery that Natalie encountered in Shanghai.

Here's what she told me:

JS: Natalie, thanks for doing this interview. What surprised you most about Asian coaches and the Asian coaching industry?

NTM: Asian coaches are so very interested to be on the leading edge of coaching! It's very inspiring to recognize how much we can learn from one another and that coaching opens those doors of sharing and possibility. The very nature of coaching encourages this as no other profession ever has, and it allows coaching's trademark "win-win".

Coaches around the globe see coaching as a way to bring about positive change for humanity, and there may be no place where that is more evident than in Asia. There is a great desire to help others, and improve the conditions of people's lives and work. There do not seem to be borders for the coaches who recognize these possibilities.

JS: Wow, that's truly inspiring! What stood out for you in terms of the attitudes of Asian coaches toward certification and training?

NTM: There is a powerful desire to achieve high levels of mastery in coaching. The coaches I spoke with in Asia want to know what the requirements for coaching mastery are and what needs to be done in order to fulfill those requirements. They seemed very interested in understanding the nuances of transformative coaching outcomes and learning what it takes to coach at that level.

JS: They sounds like high achievers! No wonder there is so much happening in the Asian coaching world. Describe the people who attended this coaching conference. What were they curious about? What kinds of questions did they ask and what did you tell them?

NTM: It was truly an international conference, with Asian representation as well as coaches from Europe, Australia and North America. There were certified coaches, coaches curious about certification, owners of coach training programs and representatives from companies who either shared their coaching success stories, or wanted to know what to expect by including coaching in their employee support programs.

Since this was based in China, there was a lot of interest in how and even if coaching skills could be applied cross culturally. What was concluded was that, when applying high coaching standards, cultural differences do not inhibit the process. There is great interest and support for the IAC Coaching Masteries® as a model for global standards.

JS: What do you see as the future of coaching in Asia and elsewhere?

NTM: I believe we will see a unifying of global coaching standards and a continued trajectory of professionalism in coaching. And as a huge success for the IAC, I think we'll see more live conferences hosted by the IAC.

Also, there are many Asian corporations bringing a coaching culture into their companies and this will continue to grow to all sectors of business, large and small. As China continues to grow as an economic and business center, there is great potential for coaching to grow there as well as all around the world. There are far more similarities than differences among people and this conference reinforced that for me in a big way!

JS: Thanks again, Natalie, for being the great leader that you are. I know our coaching students feel blessed to get to work with you!

If you have a pasion for coaching mastery and want to train with one of the very best, you can do so very affordably and from where ever you are in the world. Natalie with be teaching IAC Coaching Mastery 7 starting April 6th via live tele-webinar. Join Mastery 7 here.

We also have a limited-time special opportunity for new members of our Full Coach Training Program and Certified Coach Training Program where they can work with a certified mentor coach for three months at no extra charge and Natalie is one of our mentor coaches!

CoachWant to know more about how you can work with Natalie? Call 1-877-224-2680 or email here to make an appointment with one of our enrollment advisors.

 

Topics: Coaching, Coaches, Coach Certification, IAC Certified Coach, IAC Coaching Masteries, Natalie Tucker Miller, IAC

Inside School of Coaching Mastery

Posted by Julia Stewart

Coaching InsidersWe're adding some major upgrades to our students' experiences at School of Coaching Mastery.

One new change is that Dean of Students, Natalie Tucker Miller, IAC-CC, is taking a more active role in orientation of new students, as well as answering questions for ongoing students and helping them stay on track with goals like IAC Coach Certification. Natalie of course, is an amazing coach and master instructor (She's leading our Mastery 6 Clarifying module, this month.). She's also past President and current Lead Certifier for the IAC. This month, she's speaking at the Shanghai Coaching Conference, too. Busy lady! But not too busy to meet personally with new coaching students to help them get off to a fantastic start with their coaching careers.

The second change is one that Curriculum Coordinator, Dee Taviner, has been hard at work on for months. It's a new membership and content management system that is really slick. We are SO excited about the possibilities that this new system adds for our students. Plus, we're adding a whole new way to play for coaches who want inside coaching knowledge, but don't need or aren't ready for a full-service coach training school. We're almost ready for a few beta testers. Please stand by...

And speaking of Dee Taviner, I can't help but mention our ongoing Study Groups. There are so many ways a study group can enhance your career (just ask Natalie), but that topic deserves its own blog post. I DO want you to know that in addition to Dee's Seven Secrets of Certification Student Group, talented SCM coach/student, Heidi Courtney, is now leading the Coaching Co-op Study Group.

join a coaching study group

 

Join a free Coaching Study Group here.

Topics: Coaching, Coaches, coach, Coach Certification, Natalie Tucker Miller, IAC, Coaching Study Groups

Life Coaching, Terrorism and Harvard. Wha??

Posted by Julia Stewart

Coach Reporter

While prepping for my interview tomorrow with Coach Reporter, MarkJoyella, I came across some fascinating tidbits on coaching in the posts filed by Mark at Coaching Commons.

As a former TV journalist (and Emmy Award winner), Mark keeps his finger on the coaching pulse like the pro that he is. Who better to interview on current trends in coaching for the January teleconference meeting of the IAC North American Virtual Chapter?

Some of these trends ultimately will impact how you practice the profession of coaching. And if there is one trend in coaching that never seems to go away, it's that the coaches who succeed best are either the ones leading the way or those who keep up and adapt quickly to important trends. 

You need to be at this interview. 

We'll be talking about the latest research on coaching, business mergers, high tech developments and job opportunities and we'll even touch on the story that I think proves that coaching has already gone mainstream!

There'll be a quick Q&A at the end of the interview, followed by 30 minutes on some Mastery 1 coaching skills that you probably already have, but may not be using, which can simplify your coaching and lead to happier more successful clients. 

We meet Thursday, January 14th, 2 - 3:30 PM Eastern/NY Time. To join this call and receive notifications on upcoming calls, as well as a white paper on 'How to Become an IAC Certified Coach', a recorded interview with IAC Certifiers, Natalie Tucker Miller and Elizabeth Nofziger, plus the IAC Notes - all for free -

IAC White Paper

 

Join IAC NAC Here. 

Topics: Coaching, Free, Natalie Tucker Miller, IAC Certification, how to become a certified life coach, Elizabeth Nofziger, Life Coaching, Coaching Commons

Master What Coach Certifiers Are Looking For

Posted by Julia Stewart

IAC Coaching Masteries

Harvard is studying us.
The CEO of Google is bragging about us.
Even the Wall Street Journal has great things to say about coaching.

Guess what? The ‘wild west' days of coaching are over.

Cliches about coaching that held true ten years ago, like that  coaches really don't need to be certified, aren't holding up like they used to.

Our surveys show that about 70% of coaches want coach certification, not because they're insecure, but just because it feels right to them. And since other surveys find that untrained, uncertified coaches are less likely to succeed, that intuition is well founded.

But coaches are busy with their businesses, so actually getting certified gets shoved to the back burner. It's a Catch 22. 

So we're giving you a one-time-only reason to pay close attention and get certified, right now: Starting November 16th, three certifiers (Natalie Tucker Miller, IAC-CC, Elizabeth Nofziger, IAC-CC, and Julia Stewart, IAC-CC)* are getting together for an eight hour course to teach you in detail what you need to pass certification. We've rolled it into three packages, so if you need a refresher course, first, you'll get that, and if you're ready to record your coaching sessions, you can get that too and save money.

2010 could be the year that you put those coveted letters after your name. 

Click below to find out more and choose the package that fits your needs best. Or call 877-224-2780 to ask about further customization to help you get certified. 

*We'll be working with the IAC Coaching MasteriesTM. We were the first coach training company in the world to be licensed to teach them and collectively, we've taught mentored or certified most of today's IAC Certified Coaches. In fact, Natalie and Elizabeth are current IAC Certifiers. But we are representing School of Coaching Mastery in this course, not the IAC, itself. 

If you'd like to hear a recording that will give you a taste of the learning you'll get from this value-packed course, the three of us  just did a call for the IAC North American Virtual Chapter and you'll immediately get a copy of that recording for joining, which is free.  

Certified Coach

Go here for more info about Certified Coach: Master What the Certifiers Are Looking For 

Topics: IAC-CC, IAC Certified Coach, IAC Coaching Masteries, Natalie Tucker Miller, IAC Certification, How to Become a Certified Coach, Elizabeth Nofziger, IAC, certified coach

New IAC Certified Coach Tells How She Did It

Posted by Julia Stewart

Jan O'Brien, IAC-CCJan O'Brien, IAC-CC, is the latest coach that we have helped get certified.

I talked to Jan by phone yesterday, because I knew our readers would be curious about how she did it and what it was like. Jan is one of the 25% of coaches whose applications are passed by the IAC Certifiers. She's also one of an even smaller number of coaches who pass on the first try. I wasn't surprised to hear that, because Jan is a wonderful coach. And as I said in our interview, it's a big accomplishment and now she's a member of 'the club'!

What follows are a few excerpts from our conversation and then the entire 23-minute recording, so you can listen in. There also is a link at the bottom to a new SCM program called, Certified Coach: Master What the Certifiers Are Looking For.

Disclaimer: Jan says some extremely nice things about School of Coaching Mastery  and of course, she was saying them to the owner of the school, so take it with a grain of salt if you like, but I believed her. ;-)

On what it means to her to be an IAC Certified Coach now: ‘Profound meaning to me. Professionally that makes a big difference in the coaching business. I'm an IAC-CC and it's wonderful to put that after my name. But knowing that I stayed with it that. I was committed and it was what I really wanted and I'm absolutely passionate about it!'

Her background and how she got into coaching: ‘I'm an intercultural trainer and consultant, cultural orientation training. Originally I'm from the UK and am now living in Houston, Texas. I came into coaching via my coach who is a totally astounding and wonderful coach, called Mattison Grey. I just was so impressed and so assisted by being coached. I thought, Wow this might be a really amazing job to do!'

On what she learned while preparing for certification: ‘I found that going through your certification course was, my experience of person development, was very profound, more than I could have imagined. It seemed to get deeper and deeper and deeper. And that's my own experience...I want to do that, anyway. It also put me on the fast track for that personal development. So that's a very significant piece for me.

I found the instruction to be absolutely excellent, classes with you and Natalie. They were very well facilitated and you both held us in the highest respect even when we were struggling. And it's not easy! There was so much more to this!

I had to hold onto the stair rails very tightly at times. And it was through those challenging times that I so appreciated everybody, the instructors as well as the other people in the class.'

On IAC grading: ‘Challenging. Very high standards. You don't get away with anything, and not that I was trying to get away with anything, but even the masteries I thought I had really gotten well in the recordings. Everything is thoroughly sliced and diced and of course also very honoring...That was little surprising only because I didn't know what to expect.'

Advice for coaches who want to get certified: ‘The practicums are extremely helpful in getting the feedback you need. In addition...I personally have been working with a group of wonderful coaches here in Houston in a study group. That's been absolutely wonderful.
I would also recommend that to get ones own coach whilst you're working on it. There might be things that come up...old deep-seated fears...working with a coach to remove some of the blocks that come up.'

It's an absolutely just glorious feeling!'

Listen to the entire recording here:

Topics: Coach Certification, IAC-CC, IAC Certified Coach, Natalie Tucker Miller, IAC Certification, How to Become a Certified Coach, Mattison Grey, Certification Practicum, Become a Masterful Coach, certified coach

One of the Secrets of Coaching Success

Posted by Julia Stewart

AmericaFor some reason, the coaches who are best known among other coaches are also the most successful.

Why? Other coaches recommend them, develop joint partnerships with them, share new opportunities, tools, methods and more with them. All of this makes it much, much easier to attract clients and true prosperity.

 On the surface, it doesn't seem to make much sense, but networking with other coaches is vital to your success, especially during your early years of coaching.

At SCM, we're always looking for more ways to bring coaches together, so they can benefit from this powerful coaching juice and now we have another resource that is totally new and you're invited to join for free:

The IAC North American Virtual Chapter

What is it?

It's a virtual networking opportunity for coaches across the continent (although coaches around the world are already joining and are thoroughly welcome). Within it, you can connect, network, build friendships and partnerships, become known, learn more, share more and have a vote on everything we do. And it's all free.

We meet once per month via teleconference and in between, we connect via our social networking group. So you continue growing and cementing those relationships everyday and have a say about what's going on. It's your career, so we know how important it is to you.

Our first meeting is in one week and we have two current IAC Certifying Examiners* as guests, Natalie Tucker Miller, IAC-CC, and Elizabeth Nofziger, IAC-CC (Read bios here).

Topic: What Are the Certifiers Really Looking For?

Our permanent schedule will be decided by vote, so join up early and tell us when you want to get together. This first meeting will be at 8 - 9:30 PM Eastern/NY Time and you'll be able to call in later to hear the recording, so even if this time doesn't work for you, JOIN. It only takes a minute.

And please, do your coaching colleagues a favor and share this post with them via email, Facebook, Twitter, or whatever you prefer. Just use the buttons at the top of this post. They make it easy and instant.

Red Asterisk

 

Go here to become a member of the IAC North American Virtual Chapter.

Disclosure: Both Natalie and Elizabeth are instructors and certifiers for SCM, as well.

 

Topics: Coaching, Coaches, coach, Natalie Tucker Miller, Elizabeth Nofziger, IAC

Get Coach Certification: New SCM Certified Mastery Coach Designation

Posted by Julia Stewart

Confident Certified Coach

I want to share with you some exciting news with you: School of Coaching Mastery is now offering the SCM Certified Mastery Coach Designation to masterful coaches.

We continue to successfully prepare coaches for IAC Certification, but in view of developments that we’re experiencing in our *laboratory* for coaching mastery, which is SCM itself, we feel a need to offer another path to coach certification.

Here’s one problem that we face: Once a certification standard has been defined and adopted, it already is becoming an artifact of the past. And since coaching is always evolving, we want to know we have a certification that recognizes truly great cutting-edge coaching, while allowing coaches to explore and develop new, unheard-of approaches to delivering transformative conversations.

This has been a difficult issue ever since coach certification was invented.

Given that the bar for great coaching is constantly being raised by the brilliant new coaches who join our ranks every year, it’s necessary that a certification that attempts to measure “mastery” be flexible.

So I am building into our new certification an “inter-developmental” component. In other words, the certifiers won’t just be looking for what we’ve already defined as great coaching; we will also be looking for how each coaching session expands our understanding of coaching mastery.

In other words we expect to learn from you.

This decision was based on numerous events, including listening to the preferences of our amazing students, who coach within their own unique styles and although they are committed to mastery and would love the stamp of approval that certification brings, they don’t want to be cookie-cutter coaches or get stuck in a quantified box called “Coach Certification.”

That wouldn’t serve them. Nor would it serve the coaching profession.

I applaud their courage, creativity and genius. The Certified Mastery Coach designation is for them and for YOU if you want it – and if you can teach us something!

Natalie Tucker Miller, IAC-CC (SCM Master Instructor, IAC Certifier and former President of the IAC) and I have had numerous conversations about this new certification and she will join me, along with Elizabeth Nofziger, IAC-CC (SCM Instructor and IAC Certifier) in preparing and grading coaches to be SCM Certified Mastery Coaches.

As you know, we’ve been successfully preparing coaches for IAC certification for several years. And I’m not suggesting that IAC Certification isn’t still the gold standard. What I’m saying is that even the IAC isn’t a perfect fit for everybody. Some of the greatest coaches I know have been talking to me about the need for a certification with extremely high standards, that has expansion and new possibilities built right into it.

The only way I can see for this to happen is for the certifiers (our certifiers) to relinquish our “expertise” and approach every coaching session with beginners’ minds.

Is this possible? I believe it is!

And I’m so excited, I got started right away with the February Certification Practicum. I'm already grading SCM students with our automatic system, which allows certifiers to score in real time, rather than spending hours listening to recorded sessions, taking notes, analyzing and discussing the details, before agreeing on a numeric score. This feels much more coach-like to me and it gives the certifiers the opportunity to override the grading system, if they feel the coach has demonstrated coaching mastery in a new way.

If you would like to be among the very first to set a whole new standard in coach certification…

Then join me on four Tuesdays, April 7 - 28, 8 -10 PM Eastern/NY Time

You’ll be one of 8 coaches who will coach, be recorded, get feedback and grading on your coaching. If your sessions are strong enough, you can get certified by us, and/or turn in your recorded sessions for IAC Certification.

We already have 4 coaches. We have room for 4 more.

This is the ideal way for advanced coaches to become even more masterful and if you are an outstanding coach then, even if you don’t conform to our pre-conceived notions, if you expand our understanding of coaching greatness, you will likely pass.

Even if you don’t, I promise what you learn will be priceless.

So what price would you pay for this? The 8-hour practicum which I just described is $325. Normally, the certification would separately be $400, but if you register to join this group of pioneer coaches by Friday, you can pay for the 8-hour practicum plus certification and get the certification for half price, if you use the following coupon code:

Use this Code: CERTIFIEDCOACH

Save $200. Get both for $525 by Friday, March 27th, if we still have room. Remember we only have 4 seats left.

I want to be clear:

  • What you learn in this practicum will be transformative
  • You will have a chance to record one coaching session in the practicum
  • You'll get verbal feedback, right away
  • I will grade your session for SCM Certification
  • You will get written feedback, using the IAC Learning Guides
  • Your recorded session can also be submitted to the IAC for certification
  • To get certified by either SCM or IAC, you will have to submit two coaching sessions
  • We can help you record your other session for no extra charge
  • To pass SCM certification, you will also need 5 letters of reference, either from 5 clients, or from 3 clients and 2 IAC Certified Coaches who have coached you for at least three months (In the future, we will also accept recommendations from SCM Certified Mastery Coaches)
  • Two passing sessions and 5 recommendations is all it takes to become an SCM CMC, but you must be a masterful coach

If this feels like something you want to do, I recommend that you register now. SCM students get all of this and much more for fre*e, but I’m opening it to the larger coaching community at a special price and I know it will fill up.

You may also just register for the practicum for $325, but if you decide later that you want SCM certification, you will need to pay the full $400 for SCM Certification.

As I mentioned, SCM Coach Training Program students get both SCM and IAC certifications at no extra charge. They also get up to three 8-hour practicums included in their tuition. We continue to offer the highest standards and value at the lowest tuition of any coach training school, but I can’t emphasize enough that our current fees will be going up.

Here is the link to register for BOTH the 8-hour practicum AND SCM Coach Certification: http://tinyurl.com/SCM-PRAX-CMC

To Save $200, use this code when you register: CERTIFIEDCOACH

To register for just the Certification Practicum for $325, go here and scroll to M12: Certification Practicum and register:  http://www.schoolofcoachingmastery.com/life_coaching_courses.html

For questions about the SCM practicum, certification and our training programs, call: 877-224-2780

Thanks for supporting us and for being committed to coaching greatness!

Topics: School of Coaching Mastery, Coach Certification, IAC-CC, Natalie Tucker Miller, IAC Certification, Become a Certified Coach, How to Become a Certified Coach, Elizabeth Nofziger, Mastery Coach, Julia Stewart, certified coach

Become a Coach: Ten Ways to Succeed Quickly

Posted by Julia Stewart

Want to become a successful coach? Make sure your coach training includes everything you need...

Success at becoming a coach depends on your learning style and how committed you are to the process. For best results, combine at least several of the methods listed below.

1. Listen to coaching classes. Passive attendance in coaching classes is probably the most common method that people use to learn to coach and it can work - eventually. Problem is, you’re not really learning coaching, you’re just learning about coaching. (Big distinction.) School of Coaching Mastery has many classes you can listen to and we encourage you to do far more than that, as well. Read on…

2. Listen to masterful coaching demonstrations. Here, you’re getting much closer to learning to coach. You’re hearing what works. (However, sometimes hearing what doesn’t work is even more enlightening and actually practicing coaching is better still!) All our coaching skills classes include coaching demonstrations from some of the top instructors in the field.

3. Practice coaching other coaches. This is a fantastic way to learn, because it strengthens your coaching muscles and gives you a safe space to make mistakes. (To get full value, though, you need to be willing to screw up in front of your friends! ;-) SCM coaching skills Modules always include practice periods where everyone gets a chance to use what they just learned and we encourage you to practice outside classes and give you tools for finding practice partners, a.k.a. “coaching buddies”, easily. Join the SCHOOL OF COACHING MASTERY ON FACEBOOK to find coaching buddies now.

4. Get expert verbal feedback on your coaching. This is one of the best ways to learn. Get immediate feedback from an expert. Some coaches are afraid to experience this, but when done well, it’s inspiring, not painful. You learn what works, what doesn’t, why you got stuck, why you succeeded, and/or why the client resisted and how to do it even better next time. Great stuff! (Why struggle along, not knowing if you’re doing it right?) At SCM you’ll get frequent feedback on your coaching from your instructors in class and private email feedback after class. Without it, learning coaching skills can feel like target practice in a dark room! Click the link for upcoming coaching classes where you can get feedback are here.

5. Listen to recordings of yourself coaching. This is priceless! You’ll be surprised what you hear and what you learn. (Former President of the IAC, Natalie Tucker Miller, MMC, says she still records her coaching sessions for her own learning.) Your SCM classes are all recorded and you’ll receive those recordings by email within 24 hours, so you can hear everything you may have missed.

6. Read expert written notes about your coaching. This is even more powerful when you follow up verbal feedback with reading written notes and listening to the recording of your coaching session. Big “Aha’s” happen here. (As one coach put it, “Now I’m not flying blind, anymore!”) You’ll get frequent written feedback on your coaching if you take our Coaching Groundwork Advanced or Master Coach Training series. We don’t know of another coaching school that does this for its students. Check out upcoming Coaching Groundwork Advanced and  Master Coach Training modules.

7. Listen to your peers coach and take detailed notes. This uses your brain in a whole different way. When you write down what you’re hearing, you’re imprinting what you’re learning. SCM classes use ICF and IAC scorecards to speed up your learning this way and you can use these scorecards to score yourself when you listen to recordings of your own coaching, too.

8. Give verbal feedback to your peers about their coaching. When you articulate specific feedback about what you heard (Not just “It was nice”), you take a stand for what you know and you find out quickly if you’re on the right track. You’ll learn how to deliver excellent feedback in our Masteries Classes. Learning to do this, while being in service to your colleagues' learning, is fun!

9. Meet in study groups with your peers. No “experts” allowed! Without the presence of a teacher or any other “expert”, coaches start to step up and take ownership of what they know. Often, this is a crucial final step to becoming masterful. (Peer-to-peer learning is powerful!) That’s why SCM has ongoing study groups, hosted by coach/students, like you, meeting every month and they’re free. Go here to find out more: Coaching Study Groups
10. Coaching real clients. (What a concept! ;-). This obviously is what you’re preparing for. Coach real people in real situations. Develop ongoing relationships with clients, because that relationship is about a lot more than one coaching session. If you can get feedback from your clients, that’s a hundred times better. This is one of the many reasons why the Coach 100 Revolution has been so successful. Coaches get written feedback from everyone they coach and find out what works from the client’s perspective. The Coach 100 Revolution is included in the SCM Full Coach Training program.

School of Coaching Mastery is the only coaching school that incorporates all of these methods into our coach training programs and that’s why our coaches learn so much, so fast. To get on the fast track to masterful coaching, join us here.

To talk to a real person and ask questions you may have about the school, call 877-244-2780
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Copyright, Julia Stewart, 2007 - 2015
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Topics: coach training, School of Coaching Mastery, become a coach, coaching success, ICF, IAC Coaching Masteries, Natalie Tucker Miller, certified life coach, Julia Stewart, IAC, certified coach, Coaching Study Groups

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